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  • A time to cry: why we need to talk about grief

A time to cry: why we need to talk about grief

A time to cry: why we need to talk about grief

We’re more used to him making us laugh - but now the comedian known as Paul Chuckle is encouraging us to cry in a bid to get the nation talking about grief.

Following the death of his brother and comedy partner Barry last August, Paul Elliot is fronting a national campaign to break one of the last taboos. According to the Office for National Statistics, around 1,460 people die in the UK every day, yet many of us feel uncomfortable talking about our feelings following the death of a loved one.

Heading up terminal illness organisation Marie Curie’s Great Daffodil Appeal this month, Paul told The Guardian: “You must grieve and get it out of you. Talk to your close ones and don’t let any of them keep it bottled up either. Tell them to grieve along with you. Let it all out. If you need to talk to somebody, talk to them. Do not keep it to yourself if you feel bad. Have a good cry.”

Marie Curie research shows that the majority of people find comfort in remembering happy memories of loved ones who have died (68%), while our memories help us feel more connected to them (48%) and we enjoy reminiscing (44%). Yet a recent poll by the Dying Matters coalition found that 15% of Brits would feel awkward talking to someone close to them about their end of life wishes, while almost half said talking about death scared them.

None of us wants to think about our own death or that of a loved one, but talking to your family about your wishes can help them greatly after you’ve gone. Making decisions together and talking about the practicalities, such as making a will and taking out life insurance, can give you peace of mind that your family will be provided for and financially secure.

We’ve a range of articles to help you work out what’s the best life cover for you; did you know, for example, how life assurance differs from life insurance? You might think you’re too young to need to start the conversation but, in fact, you’re never too young to make a will, while insurance policies are cheaper the earlier you take them out - read our life cover myth-busting guide to find out more.